Train collision in Rio de Janeiro kills driver, injures 8

Published February 28, 2019, 7:59 AM

by Patrick Garcia

By the Associated Press
RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Two commuter trains collided just north of downtown Rio de Janeiro on Wednesday, killing a train driver and injuring eight other people.

Firefighters perform CPR on the driver of a commuter train that was involved in a collision with another train in Sao Cristovao station, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2019. Firefighters worked for over six hours to rescue the train's driver, who was caught under the wreckage. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
Firefighters perform CPR on the driver of a commuter train that was involved in a collision with another train in Sao Cristovao station, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2019. Firefighters worked for over six hours to rescue the train’s driver, who was caught under the wreckage. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

Firefighters worked for nearly eight hours to rescue the train’s driver, who was caught under the wreckage. But the Rio fire department said the man died soon after he was freed.

The train company, SuperVia, said that one train smashed into the back of another at 6:50 a.m. local time (4:50 EST; 0950 GMT) at the Sao Cristovao station, just north of downtown Rio.

The fire department said eight others were injured and hospitalized and none of them present risk of death.

The cause of the accident was under investigation.
Much of the emphasis is on how the drive to the moon was so much broader than the two astronauts who carried out John F. Kennedy’s 1962 pledge. Kennedy’s words (“We choose to go the moon in this decade and do the other things not because they are easy, but because they are hard”) hang over the movie with a kind of fervor and ambition that today sounds downright alien. Later, while the spacecraft is in mid-flight to the moon, news of Chappaquiddick and Ted Kennedy will play on NASA television sets while onlookers, drawn back to earth, momentarily gawk.

But it’s in the thousands who contributed to the mission that the magnitude of the effort comes through. Their faces are seen in montages and their voices are heard, again and again, on NASA radio: a multitude who at every significant turn confirms that their department is, indeed, “a go.”

We have, of course, been to the moon before at the movies. Most recently, there was Damien Chazelle’s rigorous if overly brooding “First Man,” which — despite its many fine attributes — looks all the more muted in comparison to “Apollo 11.” More notable was Al Reinert’s brilliant and similarly verite-styled 1989 documentary “For All Mankind,” which also used NASA archival footage and a good score (from Brian Eno) to recreate Apollo moon missions.

But in 2019, as we are writing obituaries for the deceased Mars Rover (“It was 15”), “Apollo 11” feels even more like another time and another world. What was this splendid, sunny American dream and where did it go?

“Apollo 11,” a Neon and CNN Films release, is rated G by the Motion Picture Association of America. Running time: 93 minutes. Three and a half stars out of four.

 
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