DOH told: Stop ‘political discrimination’ in admission of patients

Published December 26, 2019, 9:37 AM

by Gabriela Baron & Minka Klaudia Tiangco

By Charissa Luci-Atienza

Samar Rep. Edgar Mary Sarmiento is calling on the Department of Health (DOH) to put an end to “political discrimination” in the admission of patients and rendering of health care services in hospital, clinics, and all other health facilities in the country.

Samar Rep. Edgar Mary Sarmiento (Edgar Mary Sarmiento FACEBOOK / MANILA BULLETIN)
Samar Rep. Edgar Mary Sarmiento (Edgar Mary Sarmiento FACEBOOK / MANILA BULLETIN)

He said a signage reminding the health practitioners and the public that all should be treated equally must be posted at the entrance of the hospitals, clinics, and other related facilities.

“Some people are deprived of proper health services or denied immediate health care because of his or her political affiliations,” he said.

“Political beliefs and affiliations should never have to be discussed or be used as basis in admitting or assisting patients in hospitals, clinics, and other health facilities,” he added.

Sarmiento filed House Resolution No. 457 urging the DOH to strictly prohibit such political discrimination, citing that one’s human right to health is recognized in international declaration, a covenant, and the 1987 Constitution.

He cited that Article 25 of the United Nations’ 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights states that “Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing, and medical care and necessary social services.”

“This human right to health (specifically the availability thereof and immediate access thereto) is also recognized in the 1966 International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights, to which the Philippines is a state party,” Sarmiento said in his two-page resolution.

He said such international covenant provides that the state parties recognize the right of everyone to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health.

Sarmiento, chairman of the House Committee on Transportation, also noted that Section 15, Article II of the 1987 Philippine Constitution also provides that “the State shall protect and promote the right to health of the people, and instill health consciousness among them.”

“Despite all these safeguards and institutionalized assurance of one’s right to health, the existence of discrimination against person due to their political beliefs and affiliation is undeniable,” he said.

He said political discrimination happens in hospitals, clinics, and other health facilities the exact moment a person is denied admission or assistance, or is treated less than any other person because of his or her political beliefs and affiliation.

“Health is such a fundamental human right that the State must employ all measures to ensure that political discrimination must be stopped and prevented further to afford every person his or her right to health,” Sarmiento said.

 

 
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DOH told: Stop ‘political discrimination’ in admission of patients

Published December 26, 2019, 12:00 AM

by manilabulletin_admin

By Charissa Luci-Atienza

Samar Rep. Edgar Mary Sarmiento is calling on the Department of Health (DOH) to put an end to “political discrimination” in the admission of patients and rendering of health care services in hospital, clinics, and all other health facilities in the country.

Samar Rep. Edgar Mary Sarmiento (Edgar Mary Sarmiento FACEBOOK / MANILA BULLETIN)
Samar Rep. Edgar Mary Sarmiento (Edgar Mary Sarmiento FACEBOOK / MANILA BULLETIN)

He said a signage reminding the health practitioners and the public that all should be treated equally must be posted at the entrance of the hospitals, clinics, and other related facilities.

“Some people are deprived of proper health services or denied immediate health care because of his or her political affiliations,” he said.

“Political beliefs and affiliations should never have to be discussed or be used as basis in admitting or assisting patients in hospitals, clinics, and other health facilities,” he added.

Sarmiento filed House Resolution No. 457 urging the DOH to strictly prohibit such political discrimination, citing that one’s human right to health is recognized in international declaration, a covenant, and the 1987 Constitution.

He cited that Article 25 of the United Nations’ 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights states that “Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing, and medical care and necessary social services.”

“This human right to health (specifically the availability thereof and immediate access thereto) is also recognized in the 1966 International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights, to which the Philippines is a state party,” Sarmiento said in his two-page resolution.

He said such international covenant provides that the state parties recognize the right of everyone to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health.

Sarmiento, chairman of the House Committee on Transportation, also noted that Section 15, Article II of the 1987 Philippine Constitution also provides that “the State shall protect and promote the right to health of the people, and instill health consciousness among them.”

“Despite all these safeguards and institutionalized assurance of one’s right to health, the existence of discrimination against person due to their political beliefs and affiliation is undeniable,” he said.

He said political discrimination happens in hospitals, clinics, and other health facilities the exact moment a person is denied admission or assistance, or is treated less than any other person because of his or her political beliefs and affiliation.

“Health is such a fundamental human right that the State must employ all measures to ensure that political discrimination must be stopped and prevented further to afford every person his or her right to health,” Sarmiento said.

 

 
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