Vatican says financial regulator to leave; he says he resigned

Published November 18, 2019, 9:16 PM

by Martin Sadongdong & Antonio Colina

By Reuters

VATICAN CITY – The Vatican said on Monday that Rene Bruelhart, the head of its financial regulator, would be leaving, and Bruelhart told Reuters he had resigned.

Rene Bruelhart, director of the Vatican's Financial Information Authority (FIA), attends a news conference at the Vatican May 22, 2013. The Vatican's new financial watchdog said on Wednesday it had detected six possible attempts to use the Holy See to launder money last year and held up the disclosure as proof it is committed to transparency.  (REUTERS/Alessandro Bianchi/MANILA BULLETIN)
Rene Bruelhart, director of the Vatican’s Financial Information Authority (FIA), attends a news conference at the Vatican May 22, 2013. The Vatican’s new financial watchdog said on Wednesday it had detected six possible attempts to use the Holy See to launder money last year and held up the disclosure as proof it is committed to transparency. (REUTERS/Alessandro Bianchi/MANILA BULLETIN)

The departure of Bruelhart, a Swiss lawyer who has been in the top job for five years, follows an unprecedented raid at the offices of the Financial Information Authority (AIF) and the Secretariat of State on Oct. 1.

A brief Vatican statement said Bruelhart would leave at the end of his mandate on Tuesday and that Pope Francis had taken steps to name a successor, to be would be announced after the pope returns from a trip to Thailand and Japan on Nov. 26.

“I resigned,” Bruelhart told Reuters by phone shortly after the announcement was made.

Five Vatican employees were suspended immediately after the police raids on Oct. 1, including AIF director Tommaso di Ruzza.

Two weeks later, Domenico Giani, the Vatican’s longtime security chief, and Pope Francis’ personal bodyguard, resigned over the leak of a document related to a magistrate’s investigation of a real estate deal in London.

The AIF has denied any wrongdoing and the Vatican’s Secretary of State, Cardinal Pietro Parolin, last month acknowledged that the deal was not transparent and promised to shed light on it.

 
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Vatican says financial regulator to leave; he says he resigned

Published November 18, 2019, 12:00 AM

by manilabulletin_admin

By Reuters

VATICAN CITY – The Vatican said on Monday that Rene Bruelhart, the head of its financial regulator, would be leaving, and Bruelhart told Reuters he had resigned.

Rene Bruelhart, director of the Vatican's Financial Information Authority (FIA), attends a news conference at the Vatican May 22, 2013. The Vatican's new financial watchdog said on Wednesday it had detected six possible attempts to use the Holy See to launder money last year and held up the disclosure as proof it is committed to transparency.  (REUTERS/Alessandro Bianchi/MANILA BULLETIN)
Rene Bruelhart, director of the Vatican’s Financial Information Authority (FIA), attends a news conference at the Vatican May 22, 2013. The Vatican’s new financial watchdog said on Wednesday it had detected six possible attempts to use the Holy See to launder money last year and held up the disclosure as proof it is committed to transparency. (REUTERS/Alessandro Bianchi/MANILA BULLETIN)

The departure of Bruelhart, a Swiss lawyer who has been in the top job for five years, follows an unprecedented raid at the offices of the Financial Information Authority (AIF) and the Secretariat of State on Oct. 1.

A brief Vatican statement said Bruelhart would leave at the end of his mandate on Tuesday and that Pope Francis had taken steps to name a successor, to be would be announced after the pope returns from a trip to Thailand and Japan on Nov. 26.

“I resigned,” Bruelhart told Reuters by phone shortly after the announcement was made.

Five Vatican employees were suspended immediately after the police raids on Oct. 1, including AIF director Tommaso di Ruzza.

Two weeks later, Domenico Giani, the Vatican’s longtime security chief, and Pope Francis’ personal bodyguard, resigned over the leak of a document related to a magistrate’s investigation of a real estate deal in London.

The AIF has denied any wrongdoing and the Vatican’s Secretary of State, Cardinal Pietro Parolin, last month acknowledged that the deal was not transparent and promised to shed light on it.

 
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