US, allies need to work together to prevent China’s control of SCS

Published November 18, 2019, 5:38 PM

by AJ Siytangco

By Roy Mabasa

It is up to the United States, its allies and partners, and all other states in the region to work together to ensure that China’s ambition to gain sea control of the South China Sea is not achieved, a visiting senior lecturer on politics and international relations from Sydney, Australia said on Monday.

China claims most of the resource-rich South China Sea, despite claims from Brunei, Vietnam and the Philippines (AFP / MANILA BULLETIN)
South China Sea
(AFP / MANILA BULLETIN)

Speaking at the “Changing the World Order? China’s Long-Term Global Strategy” forum in Makati City, Dr. Lavina Lee of the University of Macquarie said China’s interest extending control in the South China Sea is viewed as “non-negotiable.”

“It’s up to other states, the US, its allies, its partners; to work together to ensure that that ambition to prevent others from acting within the first island chain is not able to be achieved. I don’t think we will be able to change it,” Dr. Lee said at the event organized by the German foundation, Konrad Adenauer Stiftung.

Since 2014, China has been building artificial islands in the disputed waters and has transformed them into vital military facilities.

Dr. Lee stated that China’s interest in extending control in South China Sea is all about “American security sense.”

The only negotiable part of the South China Sea dispute, she added, is the possible sharing of resources that could be found in the area.

“In my view, the dispute is simply about sharing resources, all about sharing fishing grounds with all its resources in the seabed. Then I think it would be negotiable. I could say that China’s interests are about in American security sense, really about extending sea control in the first island chain. And the sea control that they want, I don’t think is negotiable,” she added.

Meanwhile, Dr. Stefan Jost, country director of the Konrad Adenauer Stiftung in the Philippines emphasized the importance of taking “seriously” China’s increasing powers and its strategies to be able to understand its development.

“It is significant to understand China’s decision-making process, its strategies, its policies and what other countries should expect from their developments,” Dr. Jost said in his welcome remarks.

Apart from dissecting China’s growing power and global strategies, Dr. Jost said it is also equally important during the two-day conference to observe and analyze the approaches and attitudes of other actors such as the US, Japan, Australia or India as well as geographically distant actors such as the European Union.

 
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US, allies need to work together to prevent China’s control of SCS

Published November 18, 2019, 12:00 AM

by manilabulletin_admin

By Roy Mabasa

It is up to the United States, its allies and partners, and all other states in the region to work together to ensure that China’s ambition to gain sea control of the South China Sea is not achieved, a visiting senior lecturer on politics and international relations from Sydney, Australia said on Monday.

China claims most of the resource-rich South China Sea, despite claims from Brunei, Vietnam and the Philippines (AFP / MANILA BULLETIN)
South China Sea
(AFP / MANILA BULLETIN)

Speaking at the “Changing the World Order? China’s Long-Term Global Strategy” forum in Makati City, Dr. Lavina Lee of the University of Macquarie said China’s interest extending control in the South China Sea is viewed as “non-negotiable.”

“It’s up to other states, the US, its allies, its partners; to work together to ensure that that ambition to prevent others from acting within the first island chain is not able to be achieved. I don’t think we will be able to change it,” Dr. Lee said at the event organized by the German foundation, Konrad Adenauer Stiftung.

Since 2014, China has been building artificial islands in the disputed waters and has transformed them into vital military facilities.

Dr. Lee stated that China’s interest in extending control in South China Sea is all about “American security sense.”

The only negotiable part of the South China Sea dispute, she added, is the possible sharing of resources that could be found in the area.

“In my view, the dispute is simply about sharing resources, all about sharing fishing grounds with all its resources in the seabed. Then I think it would be negotiable. I could say that China’s interests are about in American security sense, really about extending sea control in the first island chain. And the sea control that they want, I don’t think is negotiable,” she added.

Meanwhile, Dr. Stefan Jost, country director of the Konrad Adenauer Stiftung in the Philippines emphasized the importance of taking “seriously” China’s increasing powers and its strategies to be able to understand its development.

“It is significant to understand China’s decision-making process, its strategies, its policies and what other countries should expect from their developments,” Dr. Jost said in his welcome remarks.

Apart from dissecting China’s growing power and global strategies, Dr. Jost said it is also equally important during the two-day conference to observe and analyze the approaches and attitudes of other actors such as the US, Japan, Australia or India as well as geographically distant actors such as the European Union.

 
CLICK HERE TO SIGN-UP
 

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