Duterte signs Tulong Trabaho, Child Safety act

Published March 13, 2019, 1:18 PM

by Patrick Garcia

By Argyll Cyrus Geducos

President Duterte has signed into law the measure giving qualified recipients free technical-vocational (tech-voc) education, and the Child Safety in Motor Vehicles Act.

President Rodrigo Roa Duterte delivers his speech during the 1st National Assembly of the Liga ng mga Barangay sa Pilipinas at the SMX Convention Center in Pasay City on February 25, 2019. SIMEON CELI JR./PRESIDENTIAL PHOTO
President Rodrigo Roa Duterte delivers his speech during the 1st National Assembly of the Liga ng mga Barangay sa Pilipinas at the SMX Convention Center in Pasay City on February 25, 2019. SIMEON CELI JR./PRESIDENTIAL PHOTO

While Malacañang is yet to provide official copies of the two new laws, it was reported that the President signed Republic Act 11230 (Tulong Trabaho Act) on February 22.

The measure gives qualified recipients free access to tech-voc education as the government aims to address job-skills mismatch.

The new law also establishes the Philippine Labor Force Competencies Competitiveness Program to strengthen the qualifications of the Filipino workforce to meet the challenges of the rapidly evolving workplaces and work structures.

The Tulong Trabaho Act also creates the “Tulong-Trabaho Fund” which will provide qualified recipients access to tech-voc education and training under the programs identified by the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA).

Under the law, TESDA-recognized industry organizations seeking funding for training programs are required to submit a list of trainees who have requested assistance from the Tulong-Trabaho

Fund to the TESDA regional directors, who shall then assess the applicants and submit a list of qualified recipients to the TESDA Director General for approval

The recipient industry boards shall ensure that at least 80 percent of the beneficiaries are able to pass the Philippine Technical-Vocational Education and Training Competency Assessment and Certification System. Failure to meet the passing rate shall subject the school or training center to performance review and audit by the TESDA Board.

Child Safety in Motor Vehicles

Meanwhile, RA 11229 (Child Safety in Motor Vehicles Act) aims to guarantee the safety and welfare of infants and children, and prevent traffic-related deaths and injuries. It cites the need to “adequately, consistently and objectively require, regulate, promote and inform the public on the use of child restraint systems.”

The law provides that no child 12 years and below shall be allowed to take the front passenger seat of vehicles with running engine unless they meet the required height of 4’11”. They should also be properly secured using the regular seat belt.

“It shall be unlawful for the driver of a covered vehicle not to properly secure at all times a child, in a child restraint system while the engine is running,” the law states.

“The child restraint system shall be appropriate to the child’s age, height, and weight.” However, the restraint system is not required in times of medical emergencies or when the child has a medical or developmental condition.

The law provides that the restrained child shall not be left unaccompanied by an adult.

Mandatory compliance of the law shall only be enforced one year after the effectivity of its implementing rules and regulations. The Department of Transportation (DOTr) is tasked to craft the IRR six months from the effectivity of the law.

Those found violating the law shall be fined P1,000 for the first offense, P2,000 for the second offense, and P5,000 plus suspension of the driver’s license for one year for the third and succeeding offenses.

RA 11229 is in accordance with the international standards set by the United Nations. All manufacturers, importers, distributors, and sellers of child restraint systems are required to follow the standards set by the UN on child restraints.

Those who use substandard and/or expired child restraint system or permits the use of child restraint system that does not bear the Philippine Standard (PS) mark shall also be liable with the same penalties.

Tampering of the PS mark or Import Clearance Certificate (ICC) sticker shall be punished with a fine of not less than P50,000 but not more than P100,000 for each and every child restraint system product.

 
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